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MSJC > Public Information & Marketing Office > Phi Theta Kappa Honors Seminar Lecture with NPR’s Dina Temple-Raston

Phi Theta Kappa Honors Seminar Lecture with NPR’s Dina Temple-Raston

Dear MSJC Community,
 
Our Phi Theta Kappa chapter with the support of the MSJC Foundation is hosting the first event in our 2011 video lecture series on the Democratization of Information: Power, Peril, and Promise. 
 
Dina Temple-Raston, NPR National Security and FBI Correspondent, will give a video lecture talk on " The Democratization of Information in an Age of Terror".  
 
Please join us on Tuesday, April 5th, 2011 from 6:30-8:00 p.m. in Assembly Room 927 on the Menifee Valley Campus for this event. Political Science Instructor Eric Hass will facilitate a discussion immediately following the video lecture.
 
We hope you and your students can join us!
 
Sincerely,
The Beta Delta Omega chapter of Phi Theta Kappa


 
Presenter Biography
Dina Temple-Rastan is National Public Radio's counter-terrorism correspondent. Her reporting can be heard throughout the week on NPR newsmagazines. Temple-Rastan joined NPR in 2007, and has reported on issues that affect Americans on a daily basis, ranging from terrorism to the Muslim experience to racism. She is the award-winning author of A Death in Texas, an account of racism in America, which was chosen one of the Washington Post's Best Books of 2002. Her history of the Rwandan genocide, Justice on the Grass, was a Foreign Affairs magazine best-seller. Most recently, she has published two books related to civil liberties and national security, In Defense of Our America and The Jihad Next Door. 
 
Presentation Preview
What responsibility do journalists have to report the news, even if information they gather could put people at risk? The stories of the Times Square bomber, building a Muslim community center near Ground Zero that includes a mosque, and the Lackawanna Six provide insights into the decisions reporters make each day as they glean information from sources. What do they share? What do they withhold? How and why do they determine what is newsworthy? What role does the 24-hour news cycle play in how, when, and why reporters share information they gather? In what ways do those issues have an impact on justice in the Age of Terror? These are questions National Public Radio journalists consider each day as they prepare to report stories related to national and global security.
 
Please contact Jena Aronson, our student officer organizing the event, by email at jaronson589@student.msjc.edu or the Phi Theta Kappa office by phone at 951-487-3276 for further information.