Skip Ribbon Commands Skip to main content
Navigate Up
Help (new window)
Sign In
MSJC > Student Services > Student Conduct > Filing A Complaint--Faculty & Staff

Filing A Complaint--Faculty & Staff

To report a violation(s) of Mt. San Jacinto College's Student Code of Conduct please use the following link:
 

All complaints must be submitted using the Student Code of Conduct Violation form link above, complaints submitted through email or voice messages will not be accepted.

Complaints will be reviewed by the following administrators:

Fred Frontino, MPA
Student Judicial Affairs Coordinator

email: ffrontino@msjc.edu
phone: (951) 487-3301

Using the Adovcate Student Code of Conduct Violation form:
Please follow the directions on the form; areas marked with an asterisk * must be completed. When completing the “Description” area, please provide a brief, succinct description of the incident and be specific about the behavior exhibited by the student; if the student verbally abused you, include the expletive.

Using this new form you are able to upload supporting documents from your computer however, you may submit the hard copies through intercampus mail if you are unable to utilize this upload feature. All complaints submitted by faculty should include the course syllabus, but only the section referencing student conduct and/or expectations for your class.
 
Academic Dishonesty
If the complaint alleges acts of academic dishonesty, please upload the following documents in addition to the syllabus:
· The section of the syllabus that outlines your course policy concerning acts of academic dishonesty;
· A copy of the student's paper, exam or assignment in question
· Copies of the document the student used to commit the act of plagiarism or cheating. If the documents are internet
sources, please upload hard copies of the actual document or send the copies through intercampus mail.
Please correlate all incidents of plagiarism between the student's document and the plagiarized document by enumerating each incident to coincide with each other. For example:

Original writing: Reigeluth (1999) states that  we can think of theories "... as dealing with cause-and-effect relationships or with flows of events in natural processes," and goes on to say that they may be either "probabilistic (i.e., the cause increases the chances of the stated effect occurring) rather than deterministic (i.e., the cause always results in the stated effect)" (p. 7).

Student’s paper: Whether they are probabilistic (i.e., the cause increases the chances of the stated effect occurring) or they are deterministic (i.e., the cause always results in the stated effect),  we can think of theories as dealing with cause-and-effect relationships or with flows of natural processes.
 
 
​​